• Lorna Hamilton

Vermilion Lions Club Fills First Round Of Sandbags


Lions members, volunteers and Platoon 2 students from the Fire School with some of the sandbags they filled to sell to businesses to raise money for charity. Photo submitted

For several years the Vermilion Lions Club have been filling sandbags that they sell to businesses in the area to help raise funds for charity and charitable organizations such as the toddler playground, STARS, and a variety of community programs like Hearts and Hands. On October 15 with help from the Fire School Platoon 2 fire students the Lions filled 235 sandbags in about an hour.

“This morning we had our first sandbagging event and we were very fortunate to have a group of volunteers from the fire school. It was a huge contribution by those young people and it makes all the difference in the world,” commented Lions treasurer Peter Clark.

Clark went on to praise the young group as in addition to volunteering their time, they also donated to the organization.

“Up until this year we always had the Lions doing it and it takes longer than an hour but the group today did a fantastic job and when it was all over we give them $2 per bag, but they said don’t give us that, donate it to the Hearts and Hands program here in Vermilion. So, on behalf of the Lions Club I wrote a cheque for $500 to the Hearts and Hands program which is all because these volunteers came and helped with our sandbagging,” explained Clark.

The sandbags are now for sale at the Co-op gas bar, the Shell gas bar and the Truck and Car wash on the east side of Town.

Clark also noted that the sand and facility were donated by Ben Bykowski owner of Vermilion Ready Mix Concrete.

“With Lions members like Ben it helps us keep the cost down and we can reinvest it in the community here so it is just one of the things the Lions members are doing to not only support the Club but also the community,” said Clark.

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